The End of the Tour (2015) 720p YIFY Movie

The End of the Tour (2015)

The End of the Tour is a movie starring Jason Segel, Jesse Eisenberg, and Anna Chlumsky. The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place...

IMDB: 7.30 Likes

  • Genre: Biography | Drama
  • Quality: 720p
  • Size: 1.31G
  • Resolution: / fps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 106
  • IMDB Rating: 7.3/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 0 / 0

The Synopsis for The End of the Tour (2015) 720p

The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'


The Director and Players for The End of the Tour (2015) 720p

[Director]James Ponsoldt
[Role:]Jesse Eisenberg
[Role:]Jason Segel
[Role:]Anna Chlumsky
[Role:]Mamie Gummer


The Reviews for The End of the Tour (2015) 720p


Definitely for a very select audience but the acting sure was nice...Reviewed byMartinHaferVote: 7/10

"The End of the Tour" is a hard-sell of a movie. While it features Jesse Eisenberg (whose career have been very hot) and Jason Segal and you'd think the film would have mass appeal, it clearly does not. This isn't a complaint--many of the films I really enjoy are really not the sorts of films that would entertain the most viewers. Instead, it's a film for a narrow audience and if you think you might be among those who would appreciate the movie, by all means watch it. After all, you will see some very nice acting and the story improves and gains momentum as the film progresses.

The story is about an odd sort of interview that took place when David Lipsky (Eisenberg) of Rolling Stone Magazine hung out with literary star David Foster Wallace (Segal) for several days back in the late 1990s. Cutting right to the chase, the film begins with the announcement that Wallace committed suicide and the film is a flashback as Lipsky remembers the strange and very lengthy meeting the two had back in 1996. As I said, this lasted days as the two just hung out together and talked...making it far different than a typical magazine interview.

As far as what they talk about and the themes of their meeting go, this really isn't something I can really explain very well in a review-- you just need to see it and experience it. Instead, I would rather try to convey the style of their time together on the film. It feels like you are a fly on the wall as two intellectuals talk and talk and talk....and talk. Wallace generally presents more as an 'Every Man' sort of guy while Lipsky seems, at times, as if he's trying to impress his new friend with his intellectual prowess. What all this means...well, that's really up to the viewer.

The bottom line is that if you really like action films, this film's is probably not for you. If you love 'literature' as opposed to just reading a book for enjoyment, this movie might be exactly what you'd love to see. As for me, I think I'm in the middle on this one. I can really respect the acting as well as the filmmakers' desire to make a quality picture as opposed to a mass-marketed film. But, on the other hand, the film is slow and very deliberate. It also took a while until I really stared to appreciated it...and I'm not if I ever exactly enjoyed it.

A Conversation that Makes You Glad to be the Fly-on-the-WallReviewed byvsksVote: 9/10

In 1996 David Foster Wallace's 1079-page novel Infinite Jest hit the literary scene like a rocket. The publisher's marketing efforts meant the book was everywhere, but the man himself—shy, full of self-doubt, not wanting to be trapped into any literary poseur moments and seeing them as inevitable—was difficult to read. This movie uses a tyro journalist's eye to probe Wallace during an intense five days of interviewing toward the end of the Infinite Jest book tour. As a tryout writer for Rolling Stone, reporter David Lipsky had begged for the assignment to write a profile of Wallace, which ultimately the magazine never published. But the tapes survived, and after Wallace's suicide in 2008 they became the basis for Lipsky's 2010 book, Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself, which fed David Margulies screenplay. The plot of the movie is minimal; instead, it's a deep exploration of character. It may just be two guys talking, but I found it tectonic. Director James Ponsoldt has brought nuanced, intelligent performances from his two main actors—Jason Segel as Wallace and Jesse Eisenberg as reporter David Lipsky. Lipsky is a novelist himself, with a so-so book to his credit. Wallace has reached the heights, and what would it take for Lipsky to scramble up there too? Jealousy and admiration are at war within him and, confronted with Wallace's occasional oddness, one manifestation of which is the attempt to be Super-Regular Guy—owning dogs, eating junk food, obsessively watching television—he isn't sure what to feel. You see it on his face. Is Lipsky friend or foe? He's not above snooping around Wallace's house or chatting up his friends to nail his story. Lipsky rightly makes Wallace nervous, the tape recorder makes him nervous; he amuses, he evades, he delivers a punch of a line, he feints. When the going gets too rough, Lipsky falls back on saying, "You agreed to the interview," and Wallace climbs back in the saddle, as if saying to himself, just finish this awful ride, then back to the peace and solitude necessary actually to write. In the meantime, he is, as A. O. Scott said in his New York Times review, "playing the role of a writer in someone else's fantasy." The movie's opening scene delivers the fact of the suicide, which by design looms over all that follows, in the long flashback to a dozen years earlier and the failed interview. You can't help but interpret every statement of Wallace's through that lens. The depression is clear. He's been treated for it and for alcoholism, from which he seems to have recovered. The two Davids walk on the snow-covered farm fields of Wallace's Illinois home and talk about how beautiful it is, but it is bleak, and even in as jam-packed an environment as the Mall of America Wallace's conversation focuses on the emptiness at the heart of life. Yet his gentle humor infuses almost every exchange, and Lipsky can be wickedly funny too. Wallace can't help but feel great ambivalence toward Lipsky; he recognizes Lipsky's envy and his hero-worship, and both are troubling. He felt a truth inside himself, but he finds it almost impossible to capture and isn't sure he has, saying, "The more people think you're really great, the bigger your fear of being a fraud is." Infinite Jest was a widely praised literary success, but not to Wallace himself.

A Wannabe Linklater FilmReviewed byThomasDrufkeVote: 6/10

The End of the Tour is directed by James Ponsoldt and based on the memoirs of David Lipsky during his week long interview with famous author David Foster Wallace. Ponsoldt directed one of my favorite films of all time, The Spectacular Now, and is also directing an upcoming Tom Hanks film, so I was looking forward to seeing him take on The End of the Tour. I'll say right off the bat, this isn't a film for everyone. It's for all intents and purposes a 'talkie' that really asks its viewers to pay attention for the entire length of the film or else you'll miss it.

With that said, I liked the movie, but I didn't love it the way I thought I would. Jesse Eisenberg and Jason Segel star alongside each other as the two Davids, and have great on screen chemistry. But it's always hard watching an Eisenberg film. For the most part, he never really escapes his own personality, which is the reason why he was a brilliant choice for Mark Zuckerberg, but I digress. He does fairly well with the emotional weight his character carries at the book- ends of the film, but his performance and character for that matter is pretty dull. The worst part is that he has an incredibly annoying laugh throughout the film, which I hope wasn't intentional.

Jason Segel on the other hand really impressed me. At the surface, his character is also pretty dull, but when the film goes on it begins to make sense as to why he's playing Wallace like that. It's then you realize just how brilliantly guarded and reserved he is as David Foster Wallace. Being subtle as an actor is often one of the most difficult things an actor can do. But the film then tries to spray conflicts on the two lead characters that don't feel natural. The small romance part of this film falls completely flat on its face.

Unfortunately, I found the story built around these two guys to be uninteresting and surprisingly dry. It also is almost mimicking a Richard Linklater film, and fell short in a lot of ways in doing so. I really like Ponsoldt, but I just don't know that he was the man for the job. His ability to pull off the human drama that floods the latter half of the movie is impressive, but it doesn't really save what came before it.

+Segel's understated performance

+Does have some things to say about life

-Feels too much like a Linklater film

-Dull characters, dry story

6.4/10

The End of the Tour (2015) 720p Related Movies

El Potro: Lo mejor del amor (2018) 1080p Poster

El Potro: Lo mejor del amor (2018) 1080p

First Man (2018) 1080p Poster

First Man (2018) 1080p

A Star Is Born (2018) Poster

A Star Is Born (2018)

Black Butterflies (2011) Poster

Black Butterflies (2011)

King of Thieves (2018) Poster

King of Thieves (2018)

Blaze (2018) Poster

Blaze (2018)

Bird Box (2018) Poster

Bird Box (2018)

Barry (2016) Poster

Barry (2016)

Play Movie | bad moon rising creedence clearwater, | Download Free IPTV APP APK